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Gil Interns


Our Karen M. Gil Internship in Psychology has accepted 12 Gil interns for Fall 2022! Learn more about our current class of Gil Interns and their placement sites below.


Alberdi, Penelope
Class of 2024
Clinical Psychology Intern
UNC Department of Psychology & Neuroscience Community Clinic
penelopealberdi@unc.edu

Penelope Alberdi is a junior from Cornelius, North Carolina double majoring in psychology and Asian studies with a Korean concentration. Since fall 2021, she has worked in Dr. Barbara Fredrickson’s PEP Lab, where she helps with a study that explores how interactions with artificial intelligence can help an individual develop positive behavior goals. Her duties include running participants and coding behavioral and written responses. She also recently started volunteering in the Rodriguez-Romaguera Lab led by Dr. Jose Rodriguez-Romaguera, which investigates the circuitry involved in arousal and motivation behaviors in freely moving mice. In the future, she hopes to attend graduate school and receive a Ph.D. or Psy.D. in clinical psychology. She is greatly interested in pursuing a career in clinical psychology that will help provide Hispanic/Latino communities more access to mental healthcare. Currently, she is working as a resident advisor in Granville. She is in the ice-skating club at UNC and enjoys watching K-dramas and listening to music in her free time.


Betor, Samantha
Class of 2023
Social Psychology Intern
Personify
slbetor@live.unc.edu

Sam Betor is a senior from Shelby, North Carolina. She will graduate in May 2023 with a B.A. in psychology and a minor in conflict management. She is currently working as a research assistant for two different studies under Dr. Sara Algoe’s Emotions and Social Interactions in Relationships (EASIR) Lab. The first study looks at how UNC first-year students build and maintain relationships, and the second study examines everyday interactions between romantic couples. Both studies have increased her interest in relationship dynamics. Her main interest is in industrial and organizational psychology, specifically within healthcare systems. She is passionate about improving the lives of physicians, employees, and patients. Sam wants to use her knowledge of psychological principles underlying workplace dynamics and her problem-solving skills to help increase the efficiency of businesses and organizations. Outside of I/O, she has a deeply rooted interest in developmental psychopathology, specifically borderline personality disorder and other related disorders. She is fascinated by the research and applications of prevention and intervention methods for these disorders. After graduation, Sam wants to pursue a career in industrial and organizational psychology by attending an I/O graduate program. She is very excited to be a Gil intern because of the new experiences she will gain and the relationships she will build! In her free time, Sam enjoys horseback riding as a member of the UNC Equestrian Team, playing video games, cooking, and watching niche YouTube video essays.


Frisch, Caroline
Class of 2023
Clinical Psychology Intern
NC Maternal Health MATTERS
frischc@live.unc.edu

Caroline Frisch is a senior from Asheville, North Carolina. She is currently pursuing a degree in psychology (B.S.) with a minor in health and society. Caroline is a research assistant in the Behavioral and Early Experience (BEE) Lab led by Dr. Cathi Propper, studying how a child’s context and experiences impact their cognitive development and executive function. Caroline also works as a research assistant in Dr. Paschal Sheeran’s lab where she studies health behaviors and works to standardize the effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening intervention study designs. In these research positions, Caroline has developed a passion for conducting research for the direct application to clinical practice. Additionally, she works at the Women’s Birth and Wellness Boutique where she sells products promoting women’s health during all stages of life. Caroline is passionate about mitigating factors that contribute to negative reproductive, prenatal, pregnancy, and postpartum outcomes. She wants to work toward addressing the shortcomings in women’s health and advocating for changes that foster child development. In her free time, she enjoys exercising, baking, and listening to podcasts!


Hager, Foster
Class of 2024
Clinical Psychology Intern
Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities (CIDD)
fhager@email.unc.edu

Foster Hager is a junior from Apex, North Carolina majoring in psychology with minors in Spanish-speaking and neuroscience. Currently an undergraduate research assistant in Dr. Michael Hallquist’s Developmental Personality Neuroscience (DEPENd) Lab, she researches neurobiological and psychosocial underpinnings of emotional instability. She is primarily interested in studying emotional regulation in children and adolescents and how it interacts with mental illness. She also interns at Dr. Susan Perkins’ Cardinal Points Family Therapy and Education. After graduation, Foster plans to pursue a graduate degree in counseling or clinical psychology.


Kashyap, Kaathya
Class of 2023
Clinical Psychology Intern
Threshold Clubhouse
kaathyak@email.unc.edu

Kaathya Kashyap is a senior from Apex, North Carolina. She is currently majoring in neuroscience with minors in medical anthropology and chemistry. She has been a research assistant in the Short Trauma and Anxiety Lab at the Institute for Trauma Recovery, where she analyzed the transdiagnostic risk factors present in PTSD and anxiety-related disorders following sexual assault. Over the summer, she interned at the National Institutes of Health to study the optimization of antibodies in cleared neural tissue and whole brains. Outside of school and research, Kaathya works as a Registered Behavior Technician to improve functional communication among pediatric populations with autism spectrum disorder. She also enjoys serving as captain on her dance team at UNC. In the future, Kaathya hopes to pursue a career in medicine and pediatrics.


Kehoe, Violet
Class of 2023
Clinical Psychology Intern
UNC Horizons Program
violetsk@live.unc.edu

Violet Kehoe (she, her) is a senior from Chapel Hill, North Carolina majoring in psychology and women and gender studies. She has worked as a domestic violence hotline advocate at the Compass Center since the fall of 2020 and has been a doula with the Birth Partners program at UNC since early 2022. In both these roles, Violet deeply values and enjoys her time working directly with people in the community. These experiences have deepened her commitment to intersectional feminist activist work in the field of psychology and beyond. Additionally, she has had the opportunities to work as a research assistant in both the Brain and Early Experience Lab and the Stress and Anxiety Lab. She has participated in a wide range of research activities including data entry, study recruitment, study visits, and helping to implement feminist agendas. After graduating in May 2023, Violet plans on taking a year to continue to grow as an activist and rest before pursuing her dream of becoming a midwife. In her free time, she enjoys cooking, hanging with her younger brother Mo, playing spikeball with friends, and listening to Evidence Based Birth podcasts. She is very excited about joining the Gil team this semester!


Khosla, Ritika
Class of 2023
Cognitive Psychology Intern
Lenovo
ritika4@email.unc.edu

Ritika Khosla is a senior from Delhi, India pursuing a B.S. in psychology with minors in neuroscience and data science. Her interests lie in using consumer neuroscience and decision-making models to drive targeted behavioral change. She is currently involved with organizational behavior research at the Behavioral Lab at the Kenan-Flagler Business School. She also has experience in decision processes by working as a research assistant for the Behavior Change for Good Initiative. In the future, she hopes to attend graduate school to further her understanding of behavioral and decision sciences. In her free time, she enjoys watching stand-up comedy, exploring local coffee shops, and going for runs on nearby trails.


McGillion-Moore, Jake
Class of 2024
Behavioral and Integrative Neuroscience Intern
3C Institute
jakem@unc.edu

Jake McGillion-Moore is a junior from Westpoint, Connecticut majoring in neuroscience with a minor in chemistry. He has worked as a research assistant since fall 2021 under Dr. Todd Cohen at the Cohen Lab in the UNC School of Medicine. The research he has been involved in focuses on specific mutations associated with the formation of tau tangles and other indicators of extreme tau pathology in primary neurons and the capabilities to use this pathology as a platform for further testing and investigation. Within neuroscience and psychology, Jake is interested in the formation and treatment of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In the future, he hopes to attend medical school and pursue a career in medicine. In his free time, Jake enjoys reading, baking, rock climbing, and competing as part of UNC’s fencing team and the Irish National Fencing Team.


Palacios, Abigail
Class of 2023
Behavioral and Integrative Neuroscience Intern
UNC Mother Infant Research Studies
apalacios@unc.edu

Abigail Palacios is a transfer student and senior from Little Ferry, New Jersey. Prior to UNC, she attended Penn State University for her first two years of college while pursuing a major in microbiology. Here at UNC, she is majoring in neuroscience with a minor in medical anthropology. Abigail is a Latina first-generation college student and is especially passionate about empowering first generation students pursuing STEM careers. She has volunteered with Semillas de Unidad at UNC in tutoring elementary students in bilingual homes and will be mentoring Hispanic first-generation high school students during the college application cycle this year. In her free time, she enjoys weightlifting, listening to music and reading.
In her previous research experience, Abigail interned at the Miyashiro Lab at Penn State University where she studied bacterial adaptations in host-microbe symbiotic relationships. During her first semester at UNC, she joined the Cotter Lab in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the UNC School of Medicine where she worked on projects investigating bacterial upper respiratory infections.
As Abigail begins to explore a new side of research, she is especially interested in understanding early development of cognitive function in infants and how this development proceeds over the duration of pregnancy. Her career aspirations consist of becoming a physician and working with global communities to target major global health problems in maternal-fetal medicine. Abigail is the president of a student organization that she and a small team founded called Saving Mothers at UNC-Chapel Hill, which works to eradicate maternal mortality in low-resourced global communities as well as raising awareness surrounding disparities in women’s health. She is excited to learn more about psychological research and how it can be applied to global health approaches.


Patel, Tulsi
Class of 2024
Clinical Psychology Intern
Lepage Associates
pateltn@email.unc.edu

Tulsi Patel (she/her) is a junior from Whiteville, NC pursuing a B.S. in neuroscience with minors in medical anthropology and medicine, literature, and culture. In her freshman year, she wrote a research article about the shift toward homeopathic treatments following rural hospital closures with Dr. Kym Weed, which was published in the fall 2021 edition of The Health Humanities Journal of UNC-Chapel Hill. She continues her work in health humanities as a research assistant in the HHIVE Lab. In her sophomore year, she developed an independent research project regarding sex differences in the visual processing of mice with Dr. Rachel Penton. Her undergraduate learning assistant role allowed her to assist other students in creating and troubleshooting their neuroscience research. Tulsi is intrigued by how psychological stress and psychiatric diseases manifest in the physical body, along with how this knowledge can be integrated into impactful interventions for rural, marginalized populations. Aside from neuroscience, Tulsi is passionate about Asian American advocacy and classical Indian dance. She uses her free time for biking, spending time outdoors, trying different coffee orders, and baking (slightly burned) cookies.


Shi, Zhuoyu
Class of 2024
Behavioral and Integrative Neuroscience Intern
UNC Neurocognition Imaging and Research Lab (NIRL)
zhuoyu73@email.unc.edu

Zhuoyu Shi is a junior from Jiaozuo, China. She is majoring in psychology and computer science with a minor in neuroscience. Currently, Zhuoyu is a research assistant in Dr. Gilmore’s Early Brain Development Study and Dr. Wu’s Advanced Computational Medicine Lab. In her freshman year, she founded (aCc) – a Culture club at UNC-Chapel Hill to support all cultural identities by evoking cultural pride. In her sophomore year, she wrote a literature review on the correlation between cingulum abnormalities and schizophrenia in different groups and the use of diffusion tensor imaging with Dr. Stephens. Zhuoyu is fascinated by the developmental trajectories of the brain and early biomarkers across neurodisorders. She is also interested in the application of cognitive psychology to artificial intelligence. In the future, Zhuoyu plans to pursue a Ph.D. and become a researcher in developmental psychology or cognitive psychology. In her free time, she enjoys playing guitar, playing guzheng, practicing tea art, practicing tai chi, and spending time with her cat.


Tadross, Maya
Class of 2023
Clinical Psychology Intern
3-C Family Services
mayatad@live.unc.edu

Maya Tadross is a senior from Long Island, New York pursuing a B.S. in psychology with a minor in neuroscience. For the past two years, she has been working as a research assistant in Dr. Jon Abramowitz’s Stress and Anxiety Lab and had recently completed an independent study on the effectiveness of using the social media platform TikTok for mental health awareness. During summer 2021, Maya was also a research assistant at the Rogers Behavioral Health Research Center in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, where she assisted in various studies on the clinical outcomes of patients in treatment for OCD/anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and mood disorders. Maya’s main clinical interests are the comorbidity of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) with neurodevelopmental disorders, as well as trauma-informed care for individuals with OCD and related disorders. Sensing a lack of support for UNC students living with OCD, Maya co-founded the OCD Suport Group at UNC-Chapel Hill. She enjoys using her personal experience with OCD to facilitate peer discussions about the disorder as well as connecting students with appropriate treatment resources. In the future, Maya plans to pursue either a Ph.D. in clinical psychology or a master’s in clinical counseling psychology. A fun fact about Maya is that she has ridden a camel through the Sahara Desert! In her free time, she enjoys writing, drawing, cooking, and spending time with her dogs.